Wellness

15 – Minute HIIT Workout

Have you ever wanted to shorten your workouts and spend less time in the gym, while still burning the same amount of fat? Then HIIT is your new best friend.  I put-together two HIIT workouts: One that you can do in the gym and one that you can do at home.

What is HIIT?

HIIT stands for high-intensity interval training.  While the term may sound super scary or even overwhelming it basically just means you alternate between high-intensity work periods (like sprinting) to low-intensity work periods (like walking). HIIT workouts generally incorporate short intervals of high-intensity cardio followed by a rest period, although it can be done with strength training as well. Generally, HIIT workouts are shorter than usual cardio workouts because you are exerting maximum effort and pushing your heart rate.

 

How Do I Do a HIIT workout?

A HIIT workout should be done within 15-20 minutes, not including a warm up and cool down. Your goal is to get to your target heart rate zone. You want to get to (or close to) your maximum heart rate during the high-intensity interval. If you are a beginner you might want to get your heart rate within the lower end of the target heart rate zone as a starting point. You can also tailor your HIIT workout to you by varying the high-to-low intensity ratios. For example, beginners may us a 1:2 ratio by sprinting for 30 seconds and resting for 60 seconds. People who are used to doing HIIT may use a 1:1 ratio or even a 2:1 ratio. Rest periods are very important and allow the body to prepare for the next high-intensity period, so do NOT skip them!

 

How often should I do HIIT?

While HIIT may sound amazing (IT IS!), and you might be tempted to schedule it in 6 days a week keep in mind that this is a high-intensity workout and your body needs recovery time. You should only do HIIT 2-3 times per week and make sure you are taking a day or two of recovery time in between each session.

 

Benefits

  1. You burn more calories in less time
    • Because you are pushing your heart rate to the max you naturally sweat more and burn more calories
  2. The “Afterburn Effect”
    • Otherwise known as  Excessive Post-Exercise Oxygen Consumption and Acute Hormonal Response. This means after you finish your workout, you continue burning fat for hours afterward. You can burn up to 3x as much fat from a 15-minute HIIT session as opposed to a 30-minute jog.

 

Workouts!!!

Note: I like to do a 3:1 interval but you can tailor the ratio to whatever works best for you! For example, instead of doing squat jumps for 45 seconds and resting for 15 seconds, you can try 15 seconds of squat jumps and a 45-second rest or 30 seconds of squat jumps and a 30-second rest.

 

Workout 1: 15-25 minutes

Burpees – 45 sec Rest 15 sec

Plank Jump-Ins – 45 sec Rest 15 sec

Squat Jumps – 45 sec Rest 15 sec

Bicycle Crunches – 45 sec Rest 15 sec

High Knees – 45 sec Rest 15 sec

Repeat 3-5 times

Workout 2: Treadmill

6.5 – 45 sec

3.5 – 15 sec

6.5 – 45 sec

3.5 – 15 sec

8.0 – 45 sec

3.5 – 15 sec

8.0 – 45 sec

3.5 – 15 sec

8.0 – 45 sec

3.5 – 15 sec

8.0 – 45 sec

3.5 – 15 sec

9.0 – 45 sec

3.5 – 15 sec

9.0 – 45 sec

3.5 – 15 sec

9.0 – 45 sec

3.5 – 15 sec

8.0 – 45 sec

3.5 – 15 sec

8.0 – 45 sec

3.5 – 15 sec

8.0 – 45 sec

3.5 – 15 sec

8.0 – 45 sec

3.5 – 15 sec

6.5 – 45 sec

3.5 – 15 sec

6.5 – 45 sec

3.5- 15 sec

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